Dataharvest 2020’s focus has been climate and energy. In early September, we zoomed in onto the networks of climate deniers, looked in fossil fuel subsidies across the EU and discussed the future of climate journalism. This upcoming week, we’ll learn more about how carbon credit frauds work, who the big energy lobbyists in Brussels and the UK are, and what climate-related stories we should follow next (check out the full schedule here).

We’re also very much looking forward to launching the Arena Climate Network – a community of investigative journalists and researchers working on topics related to climate change.

The Arena Climate Network’s aims

  • to follow the stories beyond national borders
  • to facilitate information flows between journalists covering climate at the local, national and EU level 
  • to tell impactful (and often under-reported) stories

Our network will provide its members with a forum-like tool enabling a multi-channel, non-hierarchical communication; an open-source, open-access knowledge base featuring relevant journalistic pieces, reports and databases, and the necessary secure collaborative space to share information and collaborate across borders.

Moreover, Arena for Journalism in Europe is a proud recipient of Digital Whistleblowing Fund grant (a project by Hermes Center for Transparency and Digital Human Rights and Renewable Freedom Foundation), supporting grassroot organisations to integrate a secure leak infrastructure to their online platforms. Through this platform, we will be able to receive, in a secure and private manner, leaks (information and documents) touching upon environmental wrongdoings, frauds in the energy sector and impacts of the climate crisis provided by whistleblowers from different countries.

Spread the word, follow the Arena Climate Network on Twitter, and get in touch with the network’s coordinator Jelena Prtoric (jelena@journalismarena.eu) if you want to know more!