Would you like to participate in Dataharvest – but you don’t really have the money? If you are from Eastern Europe or Russia, you may be in luck: We have a number of participation grants to give out, thanks to the Norwegian foundation Frit Ord (Free Words)!

We will distribute the grants between as many countries as possible. We also strive for balance between young and experienced journalists, male and female, with and without cross-border experience.

Apply here

Where did the idea for a great cross-border investigation come from? How did the reporters accomplish their results? Which challenges did they meet on the way? In sessions under the label “The making of…”, Dataharvest will over the coming months invite you to meet the reporters behind a story and hear them present a cross-section of the work from idea to publication.

These sessions will hopefully inspire you for your own work – and give you a chance to follow the developments of investigations across Europe, even if we are all tied down by our keyboards for a few more months.

The first session is next week! On Wednesday March 22, Maxime Vaudano, Jérémie Baruch and Maxime Ferrer from Le Monde will share how they got and analysed the data for OpenLux, an investigation conducted by Le Monde along with ten media partners about the tax haven in the heart of Europe: Luxembourg.

Following “The making of…” sessions will be on April 14 at 2 pm, May 5 at 10 am, June 16 at 2 pm, September 22 at 10 am, October 13 at 2 pm, November 24 at 10 am, and December 9 at 2 pm.

The sessions will be free of charge, and you register for them here.

Do you know of a great investigation that should be highlighted in a session? Please get in touch with us!

Maxime Vaudano

Jérémie Baruch

Our series of Dataharvest Pop-Ups opens with the OpenLux investigation that put pressure on Luxembourg, a tax haven in the heart of Europe.

The tiny state of Luxembourg is the world’s second-biggest destination for foreign capital, thanks to the opacity of its financial systems. In 2018, the country created a database that would reveal the ultimate beneficial owners of all the companies registered therein. However, the database is not searchable by the owners’ names, which made it much harder to determine beneficial owners. 

But a team from the French newspaper Le Monde managed to scrape the registry’s website and obtain 3.3 million documents, covering hundreds of thousands of companies based in Luxembourg. With a help of their international media partners, Le Monde’s team dug deeper into the people who are benefiting from the companies and explored weaknesses in anti-money laundering frameworks in Luxembourg and the EU.

Maxime Vaudano, Jérémie Baruch and Maxime Ferrer from Le Monde will share with us the making of Open Lux, explain to us how they’ve managed to analyse the documents and identify people of interest in the datasets and cross-check them.

Join us for the first Dataharvest Pop-Up session on March 24, 10.00 CET. Register here.

Register for the main program of Dataharvest 2021 here: https://dataharvest.eu/register/

 

We are very happy that the European Press Prize has decided to partner with Arena for Journalism in Europe and the Dataharvest Conference when they announce the winners of the 2020 awards. This will constitute the main part of the last day of Dataharvest – Thursday June 3.

The European Press Prize gives out 4 prizes:

  1. The Investigative Reporting Award
  2. The Distinguished Reporting Award
  3. The Opinion Award
  4. The Innovation Award 

In some years, the jury also decides to give out a “Special Award” for particular excellence in editing or any other discipline, including reporting, feature writing and advocacy.

The winners will be announced in the first session of the day and in the following hours will tell, how the investigations or stories were made.

Dataharvest is not just a productive journalistic get-together. It is now also the subject for academic studies, done by German Annett Heft from Freie Universität in Berlin and published in the latest edition of the journal Journalism Studies. Her aim was to see how and why journalistic collaboration sprang up from the ground outside of the big networks – and did so by asking Dataharvest participants and Hostwriter members.

Heft’s study asks why journalists choose to collaborate, how they do it and which advantages and challenges they see. She concludes that “bottom-up collaborations contribute to a normalization of the practice through small-scale, less institutionalized, and less binding forms that enable a gradual transition towards a new mindset in the broader field”, and says about Dataharvest and Hostwriter: The “pioneering platforms foster a developing network of open-minded and multicultural practitioners.”

Read the full report here